Marine Rotational Force - Darwin

 

Marine Rotational Force - Darwin

Darwin, Australia

U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, watch a traditional Aboriginal dance during the Welcome to Country Ceremony on Robertson Barracks, Darwin, Australia on April 22, 2016. Marine Rotational Force Darwin (MRF-D) is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance.
MRF-D Welcome to Country
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, watch a traditional Aboriginal dance during the Welcome to Country Ceremony on Robertson Barracks, Darwin, Australia on April 22, 2016. Marine Rotational Force Darwin (MRF-D) is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance.
U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Steven Sutey Commanding Officer of 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, marches in the Australian New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) Day in Darwin, Australia on April 25, 2016. Marine Rotational Force Darwin (MRF-D) is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance.
ANZAC Day in Darwin, Australia
U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Steven Sutey Commanding Officer of 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, marches in the Australian New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) Day in Darwin, Australia on April 25, 2016. Marine Rotational Force Darwin (MRF-D) is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance.
Australian Army Pvt. Jayden S. Oldride and U.S. Marine Cpl. Ernesto Argote, combat engineers, search through the thicket at Hidden Valley Motor Sports Complex, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 19, 2016. U.S. Marine and Australian Army combat engineers conducted clearing training to find improvised explosive device and caches. Marine Rotational Force - Darwin is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance. Oldride, from Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia, is with 1st Combat Engineer Regiment, 1st Brigade. Argote, from Los Angeles, California, is with 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, MRF-D.
Combat Engineers clear the way
Australian Army Pvt. Jayden S. Oldride and U.S. Marine Cpl. Ernesto Argote, combat engineers, search through the thicket at Hidden Valley Motor Sports Complex, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 19, 2016. U.S. Marine and Australian Army combat engineers conducted clearing training to find improvised explosive device and caches. Marine Rotational Force - Darwin is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance. Oldride, from Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia, is with 1st Combat Engineer Regiment, 1st Brigade. Argote, from Los Angeles, California, is with 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, MRF-D.
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Stuart D. Glass, Sergeant Major 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, gives a brief to the Marines before a formation run on Robertson Barracks, Darwin, Australia, April 29, 2016. Running together helps Marines acclimatize to the hot and humid Australian environment during Marine Rotational Force - Darwin (MRF-D). MRF-D is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance.
MRF-D 1/1 formation run
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Stuart D. Glass, Sergeant Major 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, gives a brief to the Marines before a formation run on Robertson Barracks, Darwin, Australia, April 29, 2016. Running together helps Marines acclimatize to the hot and humid Australian environment during Marine Rotational Force - Darwin (MRF-D). MRF-D is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance.
Australian Army Pvt. Jacob Handley, combat engineer, searches through the thicket with U.S. Marines at Hidden Valley Motor Sports Complex, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 19, 2016. U.S. Marine and Australian Army combat engineers conducted clearing training to find improvised explosive device and caches. Marine Rotational Force - Darwin is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance. Handley is with 1st Combat Engineer Regiment, 1st Brigade.
Combat Engineers clear the way
Australian Army Pvt. Jacob Handley, combat engineer, searches through the thicket with U.S. Marines at Hidden Valley Motor Sports Complex, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 19, 2016. U.S. Marine and Australian Army combat engineers conducted clearing training to find improvised explosive device and caches. Marine Rotational Force - Darwin is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance. Handley is with 1st Combat Engineer Regiment, 1st Brigade.
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, and members of the Australian Army with 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, take on the final day of Exercise Kokoda outside Robertson Barracks, Darwin, Australia, May 13, 2016. U.S. Marines worked together with the Australian service members during Subject One for Corporal Class #0245. Experiencing Subject One for Corporal Class #0245 together allows everyone to train and learn from each other during Marine Rotational Force – Darwin (MRF-D). MRF-D is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance.
U.S. Marines and Australian Army engage in Corporals Class
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, and members of the Australian Army with 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, take on the final day of Exercise Kokoda outside Robertson Barracks, Darwin, Australia, May 13, 2016. U.S. Marines worked together with the Australian service members during Subject One for Corporal Class #0245. Experiencing Subject One for Corporal Class #0245 together allows everyone to train and learn from each other during Marine Rotational Force – Darwin (MRF-D). MRF-D is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance.
Cpl. Chance A. Benedict Jr., a mortarman, talks to Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy, about the M40A5 sniper rifle at Mount Bundey Training Area, Northern Territory, Australia, May 14, 2016. Mabus came to Australia to visit the Marines and Sailors of Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and observe live-fire ranges. Benedict is with 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, MRF-D.
MRF-D 2016: SECNAV visits Marines in the Top End
Cpl. Chance A. Benedict Jr., a mortarman, talks to Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy, about the M40A5 sniper rifle at Mount Bundey Training Area, Northern Territory, Australia, May 14, 2016. Mabus came to Australia to visit the Marines and Sailors of Marine Rotational Force – Darwin and observe live-fire ranges. Benedict is with 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, MRF-D.
U.S. Marine Sgt. Devon L. Ward and Australian Army Pvt. Jacob Handley, combat engineers, perform a radio check at Hidden Valley Motor Sports Complex, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 19, 2016. U.S. Marine and Australian Army combat engineers conducted clearing training to find improvised explosive device and caches. Marine Rotational Force - Darwin is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance. Ward, from Grand Rapids, Michigan, is with 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, MRF-D. Handley, is with 1st Combat Engineer Regiment, 1st Brigade.
Combat Engineers clear the way
U.S. Marine Sgt. Devon L. Ward and Australian Army Pvt. Jacob Handley, combat engineers, perform a radio check at Hidden Valley Motor Sports Complex, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 19, 2016. U.S. Marine and Australian Army combat engineers conducted clearing training to find improvised explosive device and caches. Marine Rotational Force - Darwin is a six-month deployment of Marines into Darwin, Australia, where they will conduct exercises and train with the Australian Defence Forces, strengthening the U.S.-Australia alliance. Ward, from Grand Rapids, Michigan, is with 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, MRF-D. Handley, is with 1st Combat Engineer Regiment, 1st Brigade.
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin pose after graduating from the Australian Subject One Corporal Course, Sept. 18 at Robertson Barracks, Northern Territory, Australia. Participation in the junior leadership course gave the allied Marines and Australian soldiers the opportunity to learn about each other’s standard operating procedures, tactics, techniques and procedures to further increase their ability to work together effectively.
U.S. Marines, Australian Soldiers graduate Junior Leadership Course
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin pose after graduating from the Australian Subject One Corporal Course, Sept. 18 at Robertson Barracks, Northern Territory, Australia. Participation in the junior leadership course gave the allied Marines and Australian soldiers the opportunity to learn about each other’s standard operating procedures, tactics, techniques and procedures to further increase their ability to work together effectively.
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, and members of the Darwin Stray Cats social rugby club shake hands before the start of the 9/11 memorial rugby match at the Defence Establishment Berrimah rugby field, Northern Territory, Australia Sept. 11. The annual match was established with the first game played between the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit and the Stray Cats on Sept. 11, 2001, right before the terrorist attacks, and has become a commemorative match for each rotation of MRF-D. Participating in the match was an excellent opportunity to improve Marines’ knowledge of Australian culture and ultimately strengthened our bond as allies. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Reba James/ Released)
Marines, Australians observe 9/11 with a memorial rugby match
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, and members of the Darwin Stray Cats social rugby club shake hands before the start of the 9/11 memorial rugby match at the Defence Establishment Berrimah rugby field, Northern Territory, Australia Sept. 11. The annual match was established with the first game played between the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit and the Stray Cats on Sept. 11, 2001, right before the terrorist attacks, and has become a commemorative match for each rotation of MRF-D. Participating in the match was an excellent opportunity to improve Marines’ knowledge of Australian culture and ultimately strengthened our bond as allies. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Reba James/ Released)
Lieutenant Colonel Eric J. Dougherty and Sgt. Maj. Marcus A. Chestnut stand at parade rest during a service commemorating the 73rd Anniversary of the Battle of the Coral Sea May 8 at USS Peary Gun Memorial, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. The Battle of the Coral Sea was a series of naval engagements, between the U.S. and Australia against Japan, which occurred May 4 to May 8, 1942 on the northeast coast of Australia. Community engagements between the U.S. military and Australian Defence Force reinforce relations that date back to when both countries fought alongside each other in World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan together. Dougherty is the commanding officer of 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin.  Chestnut is the sergeant major of 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, MRF-D.
Marines, Australians commemorate 73rd anniversary of Battle of the Coral Sea
Lieutenant Colonel Eric J. Dougherty and Sgt. Maj. Marcus A. Chestnut stand at parade rest during a service commemorating the 73rd Anniversary of the Battle of the Coral Sea May 8 at USS Peary Gun Memorial, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. The Battle of the Coral Sea was a series of naval engagements, between the U.S. and Australia against Japan, which occurred May 4 to May 8, 1942 on the northeast coast of Australia. Community engagements between the U.S. military and Australian Defence Force reinforce relations that date back to when both countries fought alongside each other in World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan together. Dougherty is the commanding officer of 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin. Chestnut is the sergeant major of 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, MRF-D.
Left to right: Lieutenant Luke Morgan, Alpha Troop Commander, 1st Transport Squadron, 1st Combat Service Support Battalion; Lt. Stephen Weir, operations officer with 105 Signal Squadron, 1st Combat Signal Regiment; Sgt. Bradley S. Minge, color sergeant with Headquarters and Support Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin; Lt. Katherine Newson, maritime logistics officer with Headquarters Northern Command, Joint Operations Command - Australian Theatre;  Flight Lieutenant Heath Fulton, operations officer with Joint Task Force 639 ACCE, Royal Australian Air Force Base Darwin, Darwin, Australia. The service members stand before the new location for the national and ensign flags during a ceremony to mark the relocation of service flags April 26 at the Darwin Memorial United Church, Darwin, Australia. The service of worship and ceremony was held in order to relocate the flags to the foyer to create more room for the "Fujita" Peace and Reconciliation Exhibition. Events in the community allow Marines to learn about the history the U.S. and Australia share, and to further the longstanding relationship between the U.S. and Australia.
Marines, Australians attend a ceremony to mark relocation of service flags
Left to right: Lieutenant Luke Morgan, Alpha Troop Commander, 1st Transport Squadron, 1st Combat Service Support Battalion; Lt. Stephen Weir, operations officer with 105 Signal Squadron, 1st Combat Signal Regiment; Sgt. Bradley S. Minge, color sergeant with Headquarters and Support Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin; Lt. Katherine Newson, maritime logistics officer with Headquarters Northern Command, Joint Operations Command - Australian Theatre; Flight Lieutenant Heath Fulton, operations officer with Joint Task Force 639 ACCE, Royal Australian Air Force Base Darwin, Darwin, Australia. The service members stand before the new location for the national and ensign flags during a ceremony to mark the relocation of service flags April 26 at the Darwin Memorial United Church, Darwin, Australia. The service of worship and ceremony was held in order to relocate the flags to the foyer to create more room for the "Fujita" Peace and Reconciliation Exhibition. Events in the community allow Marines to learn about the history the U.S. and Australia share, and to further the longstanding relationship between the U.S. and Australia.
Corporal Luis Bravoromero,  machine gunner, Company B, 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, handles an albino python while attending Reception, Staging, Onward - Movement & Integration Apirl 17 at Robertson Barracks, Palmerston, Australia, to ensure they were prepared to begin MRF-D 2015. During the RSO&I, the Marines are familiarized with the local environment, local customs and courtesies, and dangerous wildlife in the area to include snakes and crocodiles.  Marines will conduct training at existing Australian Defence Force facilities in the Northern Territory and throughout the region. MRF-D is the deployment of U.S. Marines to Darwin and the Northern Territory, for approximately six months at a time, where they will conduct exercises and training on a rotational basis with the ADF.
1st Battalion, 4th Marines receive Australian wildlife brief to start Marine Rotational Force - Darwin 2015
Corporal Luis Bravoromero, machine gunner, Company B, 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, handles an albino python while attending Reception, Staging, Onward - Movement & Integration Apirl 17 at Robertson Barracks, Palmerston, Australia, to ensure they were prepared to begin MRF-D 2015. During the RSO&I, the Marines are familiarized with the local environment, local customs and courtesies, and dangerous wildlife in the area to include snakes and crocodiles. Marines will conduct training at existing Australian Defence Force facilities in the Northern Territory and throughout the region. MRF-D is the deployment of U.S. Marines to Darwin and the Northern Territory, for approximately six months at a time, where they will conduct exercises and training on a rotational basis with the ADF.
Commodore Brenton Smyth, right, answers questions about the beginning of Marine Rotational Force – Darwin 2015 during a press conference April 13 at Royal Australian Air Force Base Darwin, Darwin, Australia. MRF-D is the deployment of U.S. Marines to Darwin and the Northern Territory, for approximately six months at a time, where they will conduct exercises and training on a rotational basis with the Australian Defence Force. Smyth is the commander of Northern Command, Northern Territory, Australia.
Commodore Northern Territory greets Marine Rotational Force Commander
Commodore Brenton Smyth, right, answers questions about the beginning of Marine Rotational Force – Darwin 2015 during a press conference April 13 at Royal Australian Air Force Base Darwin, Darwin, Australia. MRF-D is the deployment of U.S. Marines to Darwin and the Northern Territory, for approximately six months at a time, where they will conduct exercises and training on a rotational basis with the Australian Defence Force. Smyth is the commander of Northern Command, Northern Territory, Australia.
Lance Corporal John Porter has his gear inspected upon arrival April 14 to Royal Australian Air Force Base Darwin, Darwin, Australia, to begin Marine Rotational Force – Darwin 2015. Approximately 20 percent of Marines’ gear was inspected by the biosecurity officers with the Australian Department of Agriculture for any foreign soil, plants or seeds. MRF-D is the deployment of U.S. Marines to Darwin and the Northern Territory, for approximately six months at a time, where they will conduct exercises and training on a rotational basis with the Australian Defence Force. Porter, a Chicago, Illinois, native, is a rifleman with Company B, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin.
More Marines arrive to assist troops in Australia
Lance Corporal John Porter has his gear inspected upon arrival April 14 to Royal Australian Air Force Base Darwin, Darwin, Australia, to begin Marine Rotational Force – Darwin 2015. Approximately 20 percent of Marines’ gear was inspected by the biosecurity officers with the Australian Department of Agriculture for any foreign soil, plants or seeds. MRF-D is the deployment of U.S. Marines to Darwin and the Northern Territory, for approximately six months at a time, where they will conduct exercises and training on a rotational basis with the Australian Defence Force. Porter, a Chicago, Illinois, native, is a rifleman with Company B, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin.
Marines with Weapons Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, fires a Shoulder-Launched, Multipurpose Assault Weapon as part of a movement-to-contact training evolution during Exercise Koolendong, here, Sept. 3. This training evolution is the first of its kind here in which Marines with MRF-D and the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit worked bilaterally with the Australian soldiers of Bravo Company, 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment as a "proof of concept" to assess the capacity of the training ranges to support a battalion-sized live-fire event.
Marine Rotational Force - Darwin
Marines with Weapons Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, fires a Shoulder-Launched, Multipurpose Assault Weapon as part of a movement-to-contact training evolution during Exercise Koolendong, here, Sept. 3. This training evolution is the first of its kind here in which Marines with MRF-D and the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit worked bilaterally with the Australian soldiers of Bravo Company, 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment as a "proof of concept" to assess the capacity of the training ranges to support a battalion-sized live-fire event.
Sgt. Ian Polhamus, squad leader, 3rd Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, poses in front of an Australian flag, here, June 27. Polhamus lived Down Under for seven years. He said Australia feels like his home away from home.
Home away from home
Sgt. Ian Polhamus, squad leader, 3rd Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, poses in front of an Australian flag, here, June 27. Polhamus lived Down Under for seven years. He said Australia feels like his home away from home.
Australian Army Pvt. Scott Bailed, riflemaan, Charlie Company, 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, completes a buddy squat exercise with Cpl. Oziel Esquivel, data supervisor, Headquarters Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, during a Corporals Course physical training session, here, June 18. The course provides corporals with the education and skills necessary to lead Marines. Two Australian soldiers and a Navy corpsman enrolled in the course to further their Marine Corps knowledge.
Marine Rotational Force - Darwin
Australian Army Pvt. Scott Bailed, riflemaan, Charlie Company, 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, completes a buddy squat exercise with Cpl. Oziel Esquivel, data supervisor, Headquarters Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, during a Corporals Course physical training session, here, June 18. The course provides corporals with the education and skills necessary to lead Marines. Two Australian soldiers and a Navy corpsman enrolled in the course to further their Marine Corps knowledge.
Lance Cpl. Kevin Miller, 1st Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, cools down after completing a burpees exercise at the second station of a squad competition, here, May 23. MRF-D Marines ran approximately 4.5 miles, stopping only to complete different training exercises at four locations.
Marine Rotational Force - Darwin
Lance Cpl. Kevin Miller, 1st Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, cools down after completing a burpees exercise at the second station of a squad competition, here, May 23. MRF-D Marines ran approximately 4.5 miles, stopping only to complete different training exercises at four locations.
Lance Cpl. Daniel Healy, mortar man, Weapons Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, helps Michael Lindsay, a Casuarina Senior College student and member of the Clontarf Foundation, dig up dirt at the gardening site at the school, here, May 30. Marines with Marine Rotational Force - Darwin helped students with the foundation build a vegetable garden funded by the Consulate General of the United States, Melbourne. MRF-D Marines volunteer at the school every Thursday to help with projects like this and provide mentorship.
Marine Rotational Force - Darwin
Lance Cpl. Daniel Healy, mortar man, Weapons Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, helps Michael Lindsay, a Casuarina Senior College student and member of the Clontarf Foundation, dig up dirt at the gardening site at the school, here, May 30. Marines with Marine Rotational Force - Darwin helped students with the foundation build a vegetable garden funded by the Consulate General of the United States, Melbourne. MRF-D Marines volunteer at the school every Thursday to help with projects like this and provide mentorship.
Sgt. Nathaniel Fowler, supply chief, Forward Coordination Element, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, helps Alphonse, a student at Moulden Park Primary School, with a spelling exercise, here, May 15. Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, Marines with Marine Rotational Force - Darwin volunteer at Moulden to support the local community.
Marine Rotational Force - Darwin
Sgt. Nathaniel Fowler, supply chief, Forward Coordination Element, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, helps Alphonse, a student at Moulden Park Primary School, with a spelling exercise, here, May 15. Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, Marines with Marine Rotational Force - Darwin volunteer at Moulden to support the local community.
Pfc. William J. Rogers peers through tall grass during a patrol at Kangaroo Flats Training Area April 18. During a weeklong field exercise, the Marines trained at several different ranges where they executed combat marksmanship, foot patrols, and ambushes to accustom themselves to operating in the Australian outback. Rogers is a rifleman with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, is among the first to deploy to Australia under a bilateral agreement to establish a rotational Marine presence in Darwin. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by /Released)
Marine Rotational Force - Darwin
Pfc. William J. Rogers peers through tall grass during a patrol at Kangaroo Flats Training Area April 18. During a weeklong field exercise, the Marines trained at several different ranges where they executed combat marksmanship, foot patrols, and ambushes to accustom themselves to operating in the Australian outback. Rogers is a rifleman with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, is among the first to deploy to Australia under a bilateral agreement to establish a rotational Marine presence in Darwin. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by /Released)
Lance Cpl. Joshua McGinty calls in a checkpoint on the radio during a patrol at Kangaroo Flats Training Area April 18. Pilots and aircraft from the Royal Australian Army supported the Marines during a weeklong field exercise by simulating close air support and aerial reconnaissance. McGinty, a rifleman, along with other Marines with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, are the first to deploy to Australia under a bilateral agreement to establish a rotational Marine presence in Darwin.
Marine Rotational Force - Darwin
Lance Cpl. Joshua McGinty calls in a checkpoint on the radio during a patrol at Kangaroo Flats Training Area April 18. Pilots and aircraft from the Royal Australian Army supported the Marines during a weeklong field exercise by simulating close air support and aerial reconnaissance. McGinty, a rifleman, along with other Marines with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, are the first to deploy to Australia under a bilateral agreement to establish a rotational Marine presence in Darwin.
About Marine Rotational Force - Darwin
In November 2011, President Barack Obama and Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard announced the deployment of Marines to Darwin and Northern Australia for around six months at a time. During this period, they will conduct exercises and training on a rotational basis with the Australian Defence Force. The intent in the coming years is to establish a rotational presence of up to a 2,500-person Marine Air Ground Task Force.  The presence of Marines in Australia reflects the enduring alliance and common security interests in the region and improves interoperability between the US and Australia