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U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

 

U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

In Any Clime and Place

Marine Forces Pacific Photos
MARINE CORPS BASE HAWAII (July 29, 2014) A Marine with 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, runs forward while an amphibious assault vehicle drives onto the sand behind him Pyramid Rock Beach as part of the final assault during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014. Twenty-two nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 people are participating in RIMPAC from June 26 to Aug. 1 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2014 is the 24th exercise in the series that began in 1971.
MARINE CORPS BASE HAWAII (July 29, 2014) Amphibious assault vehicles come ashore as part of the final amphibious assault of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014 at Pyramid Rock Beach. Twenty-two nations, 49 ships and six submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 26 to Aug. 1 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2014 is the 24th exercise in the series that began in 1971.
MARINE CORPS BASE HAWAII (July 29, 2014) An Australian Army soldier stands guard as amphibious assault vehicles land behind him at Pyramid Rock Beach as part of the final assault during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014. Twenty-two nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 people are participating in RIMPAC from June 26 to Aug. 1 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2014 is the 24th exercise in the series that began in 1971.
An Amphibious Assault Vehicle with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, drives by the Pacific War Memorial aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii, June 13, 2016. The CAC Marines came ashore after practicing towing drills in Kaneohe Bay to gain a good understanding of what to do in the event an AAV breaks down or gets stuck.
Marines with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, inspect their Amphibious Assault Vehicle after coming ashore near the Pacific War Memorial aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii, June 13, 2016. The CAC Marines practiced towing drills in Kaneohe Bay to gain a good understanding of what to do in the event an AAV breaks down or gets stuck.
Marines with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, speak before resuming training at the Pacific War Memorial aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii, June 13, 2016. Prior to their break, the CAC Marines splashed their Amphibious Assault Vehicles into Kaneohe Bay and executed towing drills.
A Marine with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, inspects his Amphibious Assault Vehicle after coming ashore near the Pacific War Memorial aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii, June 13, 2016. The CAC Marines practiced towing drills in Kaneohe Bay to gain a good understanding of what to do in the event an AAV breaks down or gets stuck.
An Amphibious Assault Vehicle with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, comes ashore near the Pacific War Memorial on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, June 13, 2016. The CAC Marines practiced towing drills in Kaneohe Bay to gain a good understanding of what to do in the event an AAV breaks down or gets stuck.
Amphibious Assault Vehicles with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, prepare to drive ashore near the Pacific War Memorial on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, June 13, 2016. The CAC Marines practiced towing drills in Kaneohe Bay to gain a good understanding of what to do in the event an AAV breaks down or gets stuck.
Sgt. Marten L. Malimau (Right) conducts a drive stun on Maj. Todd A. Peterson (Left) during a non-lethal weapons course, June 7, 2016, at Metinaro, Timor Leste, as part of Exercise Crocodilo 16. The non-lethal weapons course gives U.S. Marines the opportunity to instruct Timorese soldiers on less-than-lethal methods to handle future disputes. Malimau is an infantryman with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, Timor Leste Defense Force. Peterson, from Westland, Michigan, is the commanding officer with Task Force Koa Moana, originally the operations officer with 9th Engineer Support Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Cpl. Preston G. Thompson (Right) instructs Pvt. Fransicso Araujo how to properly operate the X26-E Taser during Exercise Crocodilo 16, June 7, 2016, at Metinaro, Timor Leste, as part of Task Force Koa Moana’s deployment to nations in the Asia-Pacific region. The task force brings capabilities in law enforcement, infantry, engineering and combat lifesaving skills to increase interoperability and relations with participating nations. Araujo is with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, Timor Leste Defense Force. Thompson, from Wyoming, Michigan, is a military police and chief instructor for the non-lethal weapons course with Task Force Koa Moana, originally assigned to Charlie Company, 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Pvt. Hermenegildo Martins attends the non-lethal weapons course held by U.S. Marines with Task Force Koa Moana during Exercise Crocodilo 16, June 7, 2016, at Metinaro, Timor Leste, as part of the task force’s deployment to nations in the Asia-Pacific region. The course gives Timorese the opportunity to learn less-than-lethal techniques from their U.S. counterparts. Crocodilo is a multi-national, bilateral exercise designed to increase interoperability and relations with participating nations. Martins is an infantryman with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, Timor Leste Defense Force, stationed in Baucau, Timor Leste.
Cpl. Zachary A. Barnett (Left) demonstrates pressure point techniques with Lance Cpl. Christopher M. Hettinger (Bottom) during a non-lethal weapons course with Timorese soldiers, June 7, 2016, at Metinaro, Timor Leste, as part of Exercise Crocodilo 16. The non-lethal weapons course gives Marines the opportunity to share techniques with the host nation to give their nation a better means to handle future disputes. Crocodilo is a multi-national, bilateral exercise designed to increase interoperability and relations by sharing infantry, engineering, law enforcement and combat lifesaving skills. Barnett is a non-lethal weapons instructor with Task Force Koa Moana.  Barnett, from Yuba City, California, and Hettinger, from Strawberry Point, Iowa, are military policeman with the task force, originally assigned to Bravo Company, 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Cpl. Preston G. Thompson demonstrates mechanical advantage control holds during a non-lethal weapons course, June 7, 2016, at Metinaro, Timor Leste, as part of Exercise Crocodilo 16. The course allows Marines to instruct Timorese soldiers on less-than-lethal means to handle future disputes. Crocodilo is a multi-national, bilateral exercise designed to increase interoperability and relations with participating nations. Thompson, from Wyoming, Michigan, is a military policeman and the chief instructor for the non-lethal weapons course with Task Force Koa Moana, originally assigned to Charlie Company, 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Pvt. Jose Maia attends the non-lethal weapons course held by U.S. Marines with Task Force Koa Moana during Exercise Crocodilo 16, at Metinaro, Timor Leste, June 7, 2016. The non-lethal weapons course allows Marines to demonstrate U.S. non-lethal capabilities, as well as to instruct non-lethal techniques to the host nations. Crocodilo 16 is a multi-national, bilateral exercise designed to increase interoperability and relations by sharing engineering, infantry, law enforcement and combat lifesaving skills. Maia is an infantryman with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, Timor Leste Defense Force, stationed in Baucau, Timor Leste.
Pvt. Oldegar Gusmao (Left) fires an X26-E Taser under the instruction of Cpl. Preston G. Thompson (Right) during a non-lethal weapons course, June 7, 2016, at Metinaro, Timor Leste, as part of Exercise Crocodilo 16. The course gives Marines an opportunity to instruct Timorese soldiers on less-than-lethal methods for handling any disputes in the future. Crocodilo is a multi-national, bilateral exercise designed to increase interoperability and relations by sharing infantry, engineering, combat lifesaving and law enforcement skills. Gusmao an infantryman with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, Timor Leste Defense Force, stationed in Baucau, Timor Leste. Thompson, from Wyoming, Michigan, is a military policeman and chief instructor for the non-lethal weapons course with Task Force Koa Moana, originally assigned to Charlie Company, 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Capt. Jason Grimes, a UH-1Z Cobra pilot with Marine Light Attack Squadron (HMLA) 369 and a Hibbing, Minnesota, native, stands with the leadership of 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment in Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif. Grimes completed the Aviator Immersion Program with the assistance of 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment and 2/5.
Marines with Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment conduct a squad attack exercise at Kaneohe Bay Range Training Facility aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii, April 21, 2016. The purpose of this exercise was to help team and squad leaders improve their combat assault capabilities as a cohesive unit with fire support from mortars and machine gun suppression. Echo Marines buddy-rushed targets using live rounds, set up an ambush with a claymore and used rocket fire to suppress armored targets.
Marines with Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment provide suppression fire during a squad attack exercise at Kaneohe Bay Range Training Facility aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii, April 21, 2016. The purpose of this exercise was to help team and squad leaders improve their combat assault capabilities as a cohesive unit with fire support from mortars and machine gun suppression. Echo Marines buddy-rushed targets using live rounds, set up an ambush with a claymore and used rocket fire to suppress armored targets.
A Marine with Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, fires a M136 AT4 Anti-tank rocket launcher at an armored target during a squad attack exercise at Kaneohe Bay Range Training Facility aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii, April 21, 2016. The purpose of this exercise was to help team and squad leaders improve their combat assault capabilities as a cohesive unit with fire support from mortars and machine gun suppression. Echo Marines buddy-rushed targets using live rounds, set up an ambush with a claymore and used rocket fire to suppress armored targets.