U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

 

U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

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Nepalese citizens race into the streets of Kathmandu, Nepal, in response to a 7.3 magnitude aftershock hitting the country. Joint Task Force 505 along with other multinational forces and humanitarian relief organizations are currently in Nepal providing aid after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country, April 25. At Nepal’s request the U.S. government ordered JTF 505 to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
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A multinational team comprised of U.S. Air Force engineers with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505, a member of the Disaster Assistance Response Team, and a Nepalese civil engineer with the Civil Aviation Authority of Nepal, determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport,  Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck Nepal, April 25.  The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. The Nepalese government requested the U.S. Government assistance after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country April 25. JTF-505 is working in conjunction with USAID and the international community to assist Nepal.JTF-505 works in conjunction with USAID and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
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U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Mark Hoover, an airfield manager with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505 and Naples, Florida native, writes down measurements used to determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil using a dynamic cone penetrometer to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck Nepal, April 25. The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. JTF-505 works in conjunction with USAID and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
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U.S. Marine Cpl. Thor J. Larson, from Hickory, North Carolina, is deployed as part of Joint Task Force 505 in Kathmandu, Nepal following the earthquake that struck there. Larson is a combat correspondent for JTF 505, which is composed of service members from across the U.S. military. Larson is responsible for documenting the military's mission in Nepal via photos, news, video and social media. The task force responded at the request of the Nepalese government with joint capabilities and relief supplies after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal April 25. Follow Larson's work at http://www.dvidshub.net/portfolio/1234023/Thor-Larson.
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U.S. Marine Cpl. Thor J. Larson, from Hickory, North Carolina, is deployed as part of Joint Task Force 505 in Kathmandu, Nepal following the earthquake that struck there. Larson is a combat correspondent for JTF 505, which is composed of service members from across the U.S. military. Larson is responsible for documenting the military's mission in Nepal via photos, news, video and social media. The task force responded at the request of the Nepalese government with joint capabilities and relief supplies after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal April 25.
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U.S. Marine Cpl. Thor J. Larson, from Hickory, North Carolina, is deployed as part of Joint Task Force 505 in Kathmandu, Nepal following the earthquake that struck there. Larson is a combat correspondent for JTF 505, which is composed of service members from across the U.S. military. Larson is responsible for documenting the military's mission in Nepal via photos, news, video and social media. The task force responded at the request of the Nepalese government with joint capabilities and relief supplies after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal April 25.
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U.S. Air Force Capt. Clark Morgan, center, contingency engineer flight commander with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505 and Reno, Nevada native; Canadian Maj. Simon Comtois, right, a construction engineer with the Disaster Assistance Response Team; and Kumar Shresthna, a Nepalese civil engineer with the Civil Aviation Authority of Nepal discuss the process to determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil using a dynamic cone penetrometer to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake.  The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. The Nepalese government requested the U.S. Government assistance after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country April 25. JTF-505 is working in conjunction with USAID and the international community to assist Nepal.
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Edward Reid, with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505 and Hampton, Virginia native, collects measurements used to determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil using a dynamic cone penetrometer to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake.  The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. The Nepalese government requested the U.S. Government assistance after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country April 25. JTF-505 works in conjunction with USAID and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Edward Reid, with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505 and Hampton, Virginia native, collects measurements used to determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil using a dynamic cone penetrometer to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake. The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. The Nepalese government requested the U.S. Government assistance after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country April 25. JTF-505 works in conjunction with USAID and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force engineers with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505, along with Canadian Maj. Simon Comtois, center, a construction engineer with the Disaster Assistance Response Team, and Kumar Shresthna, far left, a Nepalese civil engineer with the Civil Aviation Authority of Nepal, have a discussion on the process of determining the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport,  Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake.  The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. The Nepalese government requested the U.S. Government assistance after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country April 25. JTF-505 works in conjunction with USAID and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Capt. Clark Morgan, contingency engineer flight commander with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505 and Reno, Nevada native, briefs his team on the process to determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil using a dynamic cone penetrometer to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake.  The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. The Nepalese government requested the U.S. Government assistance after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country April 25. JTF-505 works in conjunction with USAID and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Capt. Clark Morgan, contingency engineer flight commander with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505 and Reno, Nevada native, and Canadian Maj. Simon Comtois, a construction engineer with the Disaster Assistance Response Team, discuss the process to determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil using a dynamic cone penetrometer to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake. The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. The Nepalese government requested the U.S. Government assistance after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country April 25.  JTF-505 works in conjunction with USAID and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
Download Full Image Photo Details
A multinational team comprised of U.S. Air Force engineers with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505, a member of the Disaster Assistance Response Team, and a Nepalese civil engineer with the Civil Aviation Authority of Nepal, determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport,  Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck Nepal, April 25. The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage.  JTF-505 works in conjunction with USAID and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force engineers with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force 505 write down measurements used to determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8. The team tested the soil using a dynamic cone penetrometer to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake.  The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. The Nepalese government requested the U.S. Government assistance after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country April 25.  JTF 505 works in conjunction with U.S. Agency for International Development and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
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Kumar Shresthna, a Nepalese civil engineer with the Civil Aviation Authority of Nepal, and U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Mark Hoover, an airfield manager with the 36th Contingency Response Group, Joint Task Force (JTF) 505 and Naples, Florida-native, take measurements used to determine the geotechnical engineering properties of the soil at the Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2015. The team tested the soil using a dynamic cone penetrometer to determine its stability following the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck Nepal, April 25. The pavement evaluation tested to see if there were any significant changes to the soil beneath the runway since the earthquake. Any changes could restrict weight limitations to incoming flights in order to prevent any runway damage. JTF-505 works in conjunction with USAID and the international community to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
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Members from Joint Task Force 505, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Nepalese Army conduct a multinational working group at the U.S. Embassy Annex, Kathmandu, Nepal, May 9, to discuss flight operations in support of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.  The Nepalese government requested assistance after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country April 25. The U.S. government ordered JTF 505 to provide unique capabilities to assist Nepal.
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