U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

 

U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

In Any Clime and Place

US, Royal Thai Marines conduct bilateral amphibious landing

By Cpl. Aaron Hostutler | | May 23, 2011

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Sgt. Michael Uybungco, vehicle commander, 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion, 4th Marine Division, directs his amphibious assault vehicle past Royal Thai Navy medium landing ship HTMS Surin (LST 722) during an amphibious assault exercise May 18, as part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011.  This AAV was part of the second wave to hit the beach during a bilateral landing exercise with the Royal Thai Navy and Marine Corps.  The landing force, comprised primarily of reserve Marines from 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment, was delivered to shore from the landing dock ship USS Tortuga (LSD 46) by Uybungco and fellow ‘trackers’ from his battalion. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. K. Madison Carter)

Sgt. Michael Uybungco, vehicle commander, 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion, 4th Marine Division, directs his amphibious assault vehicle past Royal Thai Navy medium landing ship HTMS Surin (LST 722) during an amphibious assault exercise May 18, as part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. This AAV was part of the second wave to hit the beach during a bilateral landing exercise with the Royal Thai Navy and Marine Corps. The landing force, comprised primarily of reserve Marines from 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment, was delivered to shore from the landing dock ship USS Tortuga (LSD 46) by Uybungco and fellow ‘trackers’ from his battalion. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. K. Madison Carter) (Photo by U.S. Navy Lt. K. Madison Carter)


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Marines with Landing Force Company exit an amphibious assault vehicle May 18 during the final training exercise in Thailand for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. The FTX is an amphibious assault exercise that demonstrates interoperability between U.S. and Royal Thai Marines and Sailors. The majority of the Marines of the landing force are reservists with 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division and 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion. Reserve Marines are an integral element of the Marine Corps total force and share the expeditionary mindset that encompasses Marine culture. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Aaron Hostutler)

Marines with Landing Force Company exit an amphibious assault vehicle May 18 during the final training exercise in Thailand for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. The FTX is an amphibious assault exercise that demonstrates interoperability between U.S. and Royal Thai Marines and Sailors. The majority of the Marines of the landing force are reservists with 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division and 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion. Reserve Marines are an integral element of the Marine Corps total force and share the expeditionary mindset that encompasses Marine culture. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Aaron Hostutler) (Photo by Cpl. Aaron Hostutler)


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A Royal Thai Marine shouts orders to his troops as they land ashore during an amphibious assault evolution May 18, part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. Marines from 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment and 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion, 4th Marine Division, conducted a bilateral amphibious assault exercise with Thai Marine and Navy counterparts. CARAT is a series of bilateral exercises held annually in Southeast Asia to strengthen relationships and enhance force readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jose Lopez, Jr./Released)

A Royal Thai Marine shouts orders to his troops as they land ashore during an amphibious assault evolution May 18, part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. Marines from 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment and 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion, 4th Marine Division, conducted a bilateral amphibious assault exercise with Thai Marine and Navy counterparts. CARAT is a series of bilateral exercises held annually in Southeast Asia to strengthen relationships and enhance force readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jose Lopez, Jr./Released) (Photo by MC1 Jose Lopez)


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Amphibious assault vehicles with 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion plunge from the landing dock ship, USS Tortuga (LSD 46) to conduct an amphibious assault exercise May 18.  Marines from 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment are embarked aboard the AAVs as part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011.  CARAT is a series of bilateral exercises held in Southeast Asia to strengthen relationships and enhance force readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Katerine Noll/Released)

Amphibious assault vehicles with 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion plunge from the landing dock ship, USS Tortuga (LSD 46) to conduct an amphibious assault exercise May 18. Marines from 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment are embarked aboard the AAVs as part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. CARAT is a series of bilateral exercises held in Southeast Asia to strengthen relationships and enhance force readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Katerine Noll/Released) (Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Katerine Noll)


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Lance Cpl. Adam Carty, rifleman, 1st Platoon, Landing Force Company, shakes hands with a Royal Thai Marine after completing the final training exercise in Thailand for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. The FTX is an amphibious assault exercise that demonstrates interoperability between U.S. and Royal Thai Marines and Sailors. Carty, a Danville, Calif. native is among the volunteer reservists comprising Landing Force CARAT.  The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve is an integral element of the Marine Corps Operating Forces and shares the expeditionary mindset that encompasses the Marines’ culture.

Lance Cpl. Adam Carty, rifleman, 1st Platoon, Landing Force Company, shakes hands with a Royal Thai Marine after completing the final training exercise in Thailand for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. The FTX is an amphibious assault exercise that demonstrates interoperability between U.S. and Royal Thai Marines and Sailors. Carty, a Danville, Calif. native is among the volunteer reservists comprising Landing Force CARAT. The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve is an integral element of the Marine Corps Operating Forces and shares the expeditionary mindset that encompasses the Marines’ culture. (Photo by Cpl. Aaron Hostutler)


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1st Lt. Nishan Campbell, AAV platoon commander, Landing Force CARAT, signals other Amphibious Assault Vehicles May 17 during a rehearsal for the final training exercise (FTX) in Thailand during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training 2011. CARAT is an annual bilateral exercise held between the U.S. and Southeast Asia nations with the goals of enhancing regional cooperation, promoting mutual trust and understanding, and increasing operational readiness. U.S. and Thai militaries are using AAVs, Marines and Sailors for the beach assault on May 18. The majority of the U.S. Marines participating in CARAT are reserve Marines who volunteered for the training. The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve is an integral element of the Marine Corps Operating Forces and shares the expeditionary mindset that encompasses the Marines’ culture.

1st Lt. Nishan Campbell, AAV platoon commander, Landing Force CARAT, signals other Amphibious Assault Vehicles May 17 during a rehearsal for the final training exercise (FTX) in Thailand during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training 2011. CARAT is an annual bilateral exercise held between the U.S. and Southeast Asia nations with the goals of enhancing regional cooperation, promoting mutual trust and understanding, and increasing operational readiness. U.S. and Thai militaries are using AAVs, Marines and Sailors for the beach assault on May 18. The majority of the U.S. Marines participating in CARAT are reserve Marines who volunteered for the training. The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve is an integral element of the Marine Corps Operating Forces and shares the expeditionary mindset that encompasses the Marines’ culture. (Photo by Cpl. Aaron Hostutler)


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Marines of 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion, 4th Marine Division, drive Amphibious Assault Vehicles from the amphibious transport dock ship USS Tortuga (LSD 46) during a dry run of the final training exercise (FTX) in Thailand as part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. CARAT is an annual series of bilateral exercises held between the U.S. and Southeast Asian nations with the goals of enhancing regional cooperation, promoting mutual trust and understanding, and increasing operational readiness with allies and partners. The FTX is a beach assault with U.S. and Royal Thai Marines and Sailors. The majority of the U.S. Marines participating in CARAT are reserve Marines who volunteered for the training. The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve is an integral element of the Total Force Marine Corps and shares the expeditionary mindset that encompasses the Marines’ culture. (Official Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Aaron Hostutler)

Marines of 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion, 4th Marine Division, drive Amphibious Assault Vehicles from the amphibious transport dock ship USS Tortuga (LSD 46) during a dry run of the final training exercise (FTX) in Thailand as part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011. CARAT is an annual series of bilateral exercises held between the U.S. and Southeast Asian nations with the goals of enhancing regional cooperation, promoting mutual trust and understanding, and increasing operational readiness with allies and partners. The FTX is a beach assault with U.S. and Royal Thai Marines and Sailors. The majority of the U.S. Marines participating in CARAT are reserve Marines who volunteered for the training. The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve is an integral element of the Total Force Marine Corps and shares the expeditionary mindset that encompasses the Marines’ culture. (Official Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Aaron Hostutler) (Photo by Cpl. Aaron Hostutler)


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SATTAHIP NAVAL BASE, Thailand -- U.S. Marines and Sailors with Landing Force Company completed their culminating exercise with Thai counterparts at Had Yao Beach, Thailand May 18.

In the final scenario of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2011 in Thailand, the allied forces conducted a combined amphibious landing from two amphibious warfare ships off the coast.

Landing Force Company is comprised primarily of Marines with 2nd Battalion, 23 Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division, reinforced by Marines with 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion, 4th Marine Division.

“Our roots as a Marine Corps are amphibious in nature,” said Capt. Rudy Cazares, company commander for Landing Force Company. “The scenario for the (final training exercise) was securing a beach for follow-on forces. That’s our specialty. It’s what Marines do.”

The Final Training Exercise was a beach assault using amphibious assault vehicles. U.S. and Thai forces each had an objective on the beach to seize.

Many of the citizen-Marines are embarked aboard ship for the first time and are conducting their first assault from the sea.

“There is an entire generation of Marines that lack the amphibious assault experience,” Cazares said. “This evolution afforded them the opportunity to get that training.”

The use of Selected Marine Corps Reserve units like 2/23 for bilateral training and theater security cooperation exercises, however, is not a new concept.

“The reserve component is trained, organized and equipped in the same way the active forces are,” said Capt. Nathan Braden, Marine Corps Forces Reserve public affairs operations officer. “Consequently, we are interchangeable and constantly leaning forward to deploy as the nation requires.”

The FTX included nine AAVs from the U.S. and six from Thailand. A company of Thai Marines and a company of U.S. Marines disembarked the AAVs and assaulted their respective objectives.

While the amphibious assault was the culminating event, U.S. and Thai service members conducted extensive training in jungle survival, combat marksmanship, military operations in urban terrain, combat lifesaving skills, martial arts and sniper training.

“Despite the language barrier and the use of different equipment, I can confidently say it was a positive experience across the board,” Cazares said. “We gained just as much from this experience from the Thai as they did from us.”

The fraternity of being a Marine transcends differences in language, culture, and 8,000 miles of sea between homes.

“I would definitely like to work with the Thai again,” said Lance Cpl. Austin Holt, a riflemen with 3rd Platoon, Landing Force Company. “They were so eager to learn what we had to teach, and I was excited to learn from them, especially the Muay Thai [martial arts]. We learned a lot from each other.”

“The Thai were as professional as I have ever seen,” Cazares said. “They really laid out the red carpet for us. I can only hope we have just as positive experience in the training to come.”

The Navy and Marine Corps exercise force for CARAT is scheduled to continue training with the Indonesian National Armed Forces.

Thailand is America’s longest-standing partner in Asia with formal relations dating back to 1833, according to the U.S. Embassy, Bangkok Website.

CARAT is a series of bilateral exercises held annually throughout Southeast Asia to enhance regional cooperation, promote mutual understanding and trust, and increase the operational readiness of the participating forces.

For updates of your Marines participating in CARAT, subscribe to Marine Forces Reserve facebook feed at www.facebook.com/marforres.

ImageAAV Imagebilateral ImageCARAT ImageCazares ImageCooperation Afloat Readiness and Training ImageCpl. Aaron Hostutler ImageFTX ImageHolt ImageLopez ImageLSD 46 ImageMarine ImageReserve Imagesailor ImageSniper ImageThailand ImageUSS Tortuga