U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

 

U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

In Any Clime and Place

BEQ renovations hurried for returning Marines

By Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis | | October 01, 2009

Photos
prev
1 of 5
next
MCB HAWAII - Debris litters the front of Barracks 5070 Oct. 1 aboard MCB Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay. The barracks near completion of safety and fire renovations Oct. 18, only four months after beggining in mid-July. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)(Released)

MCB HAWAII - Debris litters the front of Barracks 5070 Oct. 1 aboard MCB Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay. The barracks near completion of safety and fire renovations Oct. 18, only four months after beggining in mid-July. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)(Released) (Photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)


Photo Details | Download |

MCB HAWAII - Matresses and other furniture litter Barracks 5070's front lawn Oct. 1 aboard MCB Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay. With the cooperation of Marines and Sailors previously residing there, the renovations originally scheduled for completion in Feb. 2010, are now concluding Oct. 18, only four months after beginning the safety and fire renovations in mid-July. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)(Released)

MCB HAWAII - Matresses and other furniture litter Barracks 5070's front lawn Oct. 1 aboard MCB Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay. With the cooperation of Marines and Sailors previously residing there, the renovations originally scheduled for completion in Feb. 2010, are now concluding Oct. 18, only four months after beginning the safety and fire renovations in mid-July. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)(Released) (Photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)


Photo Details | Download |

MCB HAWAII - A Marine drags a mattress out of a room at Barracks 5070 on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Oct. 1. Due to Marine cooperation and relative "homelessness" endured for a few months, the barracks renovations are slated for completion Oct. 18, just in time for the dense population brought by upcoming returning units. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)(Released)

MCB HAWAII - A Marine drags a mattress out of a room at Barracks 5070 on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Oct. 1. Due to Marine cooperation and relative "homelessness" endured for a few months, the barracks renovations are slated for completion Oct. 18, just in time for the dense population brought by upcoming returning units. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)(Released) (Photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)


Photo Details | Download |

MCB HAWAII - A new smoke alarm sits above a Marine as he rearranges furniture at Barracks 5070 on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Oct. 1. Marines Aboard MCB Hawaii were recently moved out of the barracks in mid-July in order to expedite the necessary renovations and is slated to be done by Oct. 18 as Marines begin returning from deployment.(Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)(Released)

MCB HAWAII - A new smoke alarm sits above a Marine as he rearranges furniture at Barracks 5070 on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Oct. 1. Marines Aboard MCB Hawaii were recently moved out of the barracks in mid-July in order to expedite the necessary renovations and is slated to be done by Oct. 18 as Marines begin returning from deployment.(Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)(Released) (Photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)


Photo Details | Download |

MCB HAWAII - As Oct. 18 approaches, the expected completion date for barracks renovations, Barracks 5070 receives it's finishing touches and awaits furniture installation, room cleaning. Oct 1 on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay.  Barracks 5070 and 5071 recently underwent renovations that focused on safety precautions such as smoke detectors, sprinklers, as well as new showerheads and a new coat of paint per room. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)

MCB HAWAII - As Oct. 18 approaches, the expected completion date for barracks renovations, Barracks 5070 receives it's finishing touches and awaits furniture installation, room cleaning. Oct 1 on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay. Barracks 5070 and 5071 recently underwent renovations that focused on safety precautions such as smoke detectors, sprinklers, as well as new showerheads and a new coat of paint per room. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis) (Photo by Cpl. Achilles Tsantarliotis)


Photo Details | Download |

MCB HAWAII -- Bachelor Marines and sailors aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii are slated to begin moving into their recently renovated barracks, which were not scheduled to be done until 2010.

Marines and sailors were displaced from their normal quarters in order to expedite renovations and ensure adequate housing for Marines and sailors already aboard base as well as those returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

The first barracks is scheduled to open Oct. 18, for Marine Corps Base Hawaii Marines and sailors with remaining barracks to open soon thereafter.

The renovations are ahead of schedule and what once seemed like challenging timelines are now complete several months early, said Mark Houston, project superintendent, Sumo Nan Joint Venture.

“We’re doing very good time wise,” he said. “We’re almost ready for [Marines] to move in – the boys are coming home.”

“It was really a smooth evolution,” Houston explained. “At first the project completion date was Feb. 2010. But, everybody came together and we were able to finish months ahead of the initial deadline.”

Houston said the Marines and sailors who previously resided there really helped facilitate the renovations by moving out entirely. Their sacrifices and cooperation during the last few months allowed the contractors to move about freely and renovate the entire building versus going floor by floor.

The Marines weren’t the only ones who went out of their way, with such a close deadline everyone involved from construction workers to safety inspectors, had to work together in order to meet the deadline, Houston added.

Sergeant Maj. James Futrell, sergeant major, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific, said ensuring Marines have safe, habitable barracks they’re proud to call home is extremely important to him and the [MarForPac] commanding general.

“It is of the utmost importance to the commanding general and I that no Marine returns from combat to sub-standard living conditions,” he said. “It is going to take some time to upgrade the current living conditions … with this in mind I ask your patience in these upcoming moves.”

The primary focus of the recent renovations were safety oriented, ensuring proper fire protection like smoke detectors and sprinklers were up date, said Steve Butala, a mechanical engineer with facilities department.

Other initiatives scheduled for completion were repainting each room, installing new showerheads, and completely cleaning all of the rooms, he added.

“The best part is having the rooms ready for the Marines coming home,” said Houston. “Support the troops – I think that’s everyone’s philosophy here, and we’re doing our best to show it.”