U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

 

U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

In Any Clime and Place

MarForPac encouraged to wipe out waste

By Lance Cpl. Cristina Noelia Gil | | November 14, 2008

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Lance Cpl. Scott A. James, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific G-6 customer service liaison representative, does his part to reduce waste by recycling paper. MarForPac personnel can now take recyclable paper products to a white dumpster located behind building one, near the post office, labeled 'Honolulu Recovery System.'

Lance Cpl. Scott A. James, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific G-6 customer service liaison representative, does his part to reduce waste by recycling paper. MarForPac personnel can now take recyclable paper products to a white dumpster located behind building one, near the post office, labeled 'Honolulu Recovery System.' (Photo by Lance Cpl. Cristina Noelia Gil)


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CAMP H.M. SMITH, Hawaii -- In observance of America Recycles Day Nov. 15, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific personnel are encouraged to contribute to a better environment through recycling paper products.

Recycling is the key to conserving our already limited capacity of raw materials, according to Mr. Jim Sibert, Marine Corps Base Hawaii recycling center manager.

“It takes years and years to grow a tree, but just a few seconds to throw a sheet of paper into a recycling bin,” said Sibert.

Not only is recycling the key to reducing the amount of waste going into landfills and conserving natural resources, but at MarForPac it could potentially save the Marine Corps money, according to Katie Ramirez, MarForPac environmental engineer.

Currently, emptying dumpsters on base costs $30 per run, Ramirez added.

“Taking the time to separate recyclables from trash avoids having the dumpsters fill quickly,” explained Ramirez. “This can potentially reduce the number of necessary pick-ups, consequently saving the Marine Corps money.”

Items that can be recycled include corrugated cardboard, printer paper, cardstock, envelopes, magazines, newspaper, one-quarter inch straight shredded paper and paperboard.

Cross-cut, shredded paper cannot be recycled because the fiber links created are too small to be re-used.

Personnel can take items to be recycled to the white dumpster behind building one, near the post office, labeled “Honolulu Recovery System.”

Classified and privacy act information will still be disposed of according to existing regulations.

Because funding is not yet available to supply shops with blue recycling bins, Ramirez encourages personnel to get creative when sorting trash.

“People can use what they have available,” she said. “You can use a cardboard box or plastic bags to go along with the recycling theme.”

As far as bottles, cans and other drink containers, individual units are encouraged to continue systems already in place, using monetary returns for unit funds, according to Ramirez.

“It takes a few extra seconds to sort out the recyclables from the trash and making it a habit,” Ramirez said. “It’s just about making a simple lifestyle change.”

For more information or questions on the MarForPac recycling program, you can contact Ramirez

at (808) 477-8911 or Sibert at (808) 257-6920.