U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

 

U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

In Any Clime and Place

CFC ‘doors open’ until Oct. 31

By Cpl. Drew Hendricks | | October 17, 2007

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MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP H.M. SMITH, Hawaii --

The opportunity to help is still here – starving children can be fed, women with cancer can receive treatment and third-world countries can receive needed medical attention.

Hawaii-Pacific Area Combined Federal Campaign started Oct. 1 and will continue until Oct. 31 with more than 2,000 ready to receive donations.

The CFC campaign began Oct. 1. A CFC representative has been assigned to each office and has all the information and documents needed to donate.

“Every little bit counts,” said Air Force Capt. Roger Bermea, the Hawaii-Pacific Area training coordinator. Five dollars a month can provide $100 worth of food to the hungry, $10 a month provides diabetes risk tests to 500 individuals and $15 a month can fund 12 days of day care for a disadvantaged child.

Through the CFC, founded by President John F. Kennedy in 1961, potential donors select a charity from the list and make a donation using cash, check or payroll contribution.

“It’s an easier way to give money,” said Lt. Col. Richard Musser, project officer, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Pacific, Hawaii-Pacific Area CFC. “The charity will get more for your dollar.”

According to Bermea, the CFC makes it easier for the approved charities to receive donations by working directly with the federal work force and the armed forces.

The CFC also helps charities raise money more efficiently by reducing the fundraising costs paid by charitable organizations. The CFC’s overhead costs are lower which means each agency’s costs are lower when contributions are made through the CFC.

According to Musser, CFC donors can have piece of mind when contributing to lesser known charities.

“All the charities are prescreened through the CFC,” said Musser. “It’s a safe way to donate.”

By screening potential charities, the CFC is able to weed out scam charities, added Bermea.

Last year the Hawaii-Pacific Area CFC raised a total of $5,961,545. CFC representatives will continue collecting donation slips until the end of October.

For more information, contact the section’s CFC representative.

On the Net: Hawaii-Pacific Area Combined Federal Campaign site: www.cfc-hawaii.org