U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

 

U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

In Any Clime and Place

Philippines host US Marines for non-lethal weapons exercise 2014

By Cpl. Erik Estrada | U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific | August 14, 2014

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Philippine Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Eric Castino performs mechanical advantage control holds on U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Joshua Rodriguez, with 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III Marine Headquarters Group, at Fort Bonifacio, Philippines Aug. 04, 2014 during the Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar field training exercise. The effective use of non-lethal weapons can be extremely valuable during rescue missions, for force protection in civil disturbances, while controlling rioting and prisoners of war, for checkpoint or convoy operations, HA/DR operations, or in situations in which civilians are used to mask a military attack.

Philippine Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Eric Castino performs mechanical advantage control holds on U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Joshua Rodriguez, with 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III Marine Headquarters Group, at Fort Bonifacio, Philippines Aug. 04, 2014 during the Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar field training exercise. The effective use of non-lethal weapons can be extremely valuable during rescue missions, for force protection in civil disturbances, while controlling rioting and prisoners of war, for checkpoint or convoy operations, HA/DR operations, or in situations in which civilians are used to mask a military attack. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Alexandra Gwinn)


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Philippine Air Force 2nd Lt. Wilzon Paul Nicolas (left) and 2nd Lt. Jayson Martir practice mechanical advantage control holds together at Fort Bonifacio, Philippines Aug. 04, 2014 during the Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar field training exercise. The effective use of non-lethal weapons can be extremely valuable during rescue missions, for force protection in civil disturbances, while controlling rioting and prisoners of war, for checkpoint or convoy operations, HA/DR operations, or in situations in which civilians are used to mask a military attack.

Philippine Air Force 2nd Lt. Wilzon Paul Nicolas (left) and 2nd Lt. Jayson Martir practice mechanical advantage control holds together at Fort Bonifacio, Philippines Aug. 04, 2014 during the Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar field training exercise. The effective use of non-lethal weapons can be extremely valuable during rescue missions, for force protection in civil disturbances, while controlling rioting and prisoners of war, for checkpoint or convoy operations, HA/DR operations, or in situations in which civilians are used to mask a military attack. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Alexandra Gwinn)


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U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Joshua McFarland with 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III Marine Headquarters Group observes service members from the Armed Forces of the Philippines and Philippine National Police practicing mechanical advantage control hold techniques at Fort Bonifacio, Philippines on Aug. 04, 2014 during the Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar field training exercise. The effective use of non-lethal weapons can be extremely valuable during rescue missions, for force protection in civil disturbances, while controlling rioting and prisoners of war, for checkpoint or convoy operations, HA/DR operations, or in situations in which civilians are used to mask a military attack.

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Joshua McFarland with 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III Marine Headquarters Group observes service members from the Armed Forces of the Philippines and Philippine National Police practicing mechanical advantage control hold techniques at Fort Bonifacio, Philippines on Aug. 04, 2014 during the Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar field training exercise. The effective use of non-lethal weapons can be extremely valuable during rescue missions, for force protection in civil disturbances, while controlling rioting and prisoners of war, for checkpoint or convoy operations, HA/DR operations, or in situations in which civilians are used to mask a military attack. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Alexandra Gwinn)


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Philippine National Police Inspector Johnathan Catig has mechanical advantange control holds conducted on him at Fort Bonifacio, Philippines on Aug. 04, 2014 during the Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar field training exercise. The effective use of non-lethal weapons can be extremely valuable during rescue missions, for force protection in civil disturbances, while controlling rioting and prisoners of war, for checkpoint or convoy operations, HA/DR operations, or in situations in which civilians are used to mask a military attack.

Philippine National Police Inspector Johnathan Catig has mechanical advantange control holds conducted on him at Fort Bonifacio, Philippines on Aug. 04, 2014 during the Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar field training exercise. The effective use of non-lethal weapons can be extremely valuable during rescue missions, for force protection in civil disturbances, while controlling rioting and prisoners of war, for checkpoint or convoy operations, HA/DR operations, or in situations in which civilians are used to mask a military attack. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Alexandra Gwinn)


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FORT BONIFACIO, Philippines – Police Officer Rafael B. Muchuelas, a lead instructor with the Philippine National Police (PNP), performs a Mechanical Advantage Control Hold (MACH) on Jonathan Catig, a police inspector with the PNP, Aug. 4, during Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar 2014. NOLES is an annual field-training exercise and leadership seminar sponsored by U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific, and hosted by various nations throughout the Asia-Pacific.  This is the 13th iteration of NOLES with members from the AFP, and Philippine National Police participating.

FORT BONIFACIO, Philippines – Police Officer Rafael B. Muchuelas, a lead instructor with the Philippine National Police (PNP), performs a Mechanical Advantage Control Hold (MACH) on Jonathan Catig, a police inspector with the PNP, Aug. 4, during Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar 2014. NOLES is an annual field-training exercise and leadership seminar sponsored by U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific, and hosted by various nations throughout the Asia-Pacific. This is the 13th iteration of NOLES with members from the AFP, and Philippine National Police participating. (Photo by Cpl. Erik Estrada)


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FORT BONIFACIO, Philippines – Philippine Air Force 2nd Lt. Wilzon P. Nicolas, commander of Honor Escort and Ceremonial group and participant of Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar (NOLES) 2014, observes a Mechanical Advantage Control Hold (MACH) technique being taught Aug. 4. NOLES is an annual field-training exercise and leadership seminar sponsored by U.S. Marine Corps Forces Pacific, and hosted by various nations throughout the Asia-Pacific. This is the 13th iteration of NOLES with members from the AFP, and Philippine National Police participating.

FORT BONIFACIO, Philippines – Philippine Air Force 2nd Lt. Wilzon P. Nicolas, commander of Honor Escort and Ceremonial group and participant of Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar (NOLES) 2014, observes a Mechanical Advantage Control Hold (MACH) technique being taught Aug. 4. NOLES is an annual field-training exercise and leadership seminar sponsored by U.S. Marine Corps Forces Pacific, and hosted by various nations throughout the Asia-Pacific. This is the 13th iteration of NOLES with members from the AFP, and Philippine National Police participating. (Photo by Cpl. Erik Estrada)


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FORT BONIFACIO, Philippines --

Service members from the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Philippine National Police and U.S. Marines from 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III Marine Expeditionary Force, began the field training exercise portion of the Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar 2014, Aug. 4.

This year marks the 13th iteration of this event, which is held annually by U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific, and consists of a field-training exercise and a leadership seminar with participants from 19 nations. For the first time, the Armed Forces of the Philippines is hosting NOLES, which promotes awareness and effective use of non-lethal weapons to maintain order in low-intensity conflicts or civil unrest.

“The skills we will be teaching over the next two weeks will be valuable tools they will be able to deploy whether it is garrison work or real life situations,” said 1st Lt. Daniel J. Matthews, executive officer of 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, III MEF and officer-in-charge of the field training exercise during NOLES 2014.

Service members participating will receive training in pressure point manipulations, proper use of Tasers, oleoresin capsicum spray, and using weapons with rubber ammunition.  The tactics and NLW used in the exercise are designed to incapacitate personnel to keep fatalities, injuries and collateral damage to property at a minimum.

This training can be used in instances of civil disturbance, rescue missions, checkpoint or convoy operations, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations or when civilians are being used to mask a military attack. NLWs and tactics offer forces multiple options while operating in a full spectrum of warfare. “Most importantly this allows you to accomplish the mission, while preserving many things at play,” said Matthews.

Training is scheduled from August 4 though the 14, with the executive seminar taking place from August 14-16.