U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

 

U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

In Any Clime and Place

Philippine, US military medical professionals exchange best first aid practices

By Spc. Matthew Sissel | U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific | May 08, 2014

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Philippine Marines and a U.S. Navy Corpsman prepare to bandage a patient during a simulated casualty exercise during combat lifesaver training at Crow Valley, Philippines, May 8, 2014, during Balikatan 2014. The training was designed for non-medical personnel and developed the skills necessary to administer first aid in a field environment. Balikatan is an annual training exercise that strengthens the interoperability between the armed forces of the Philippines and U.S. military in their commitment to regional security and stability, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

Philippine Marines and a U.S. Navy Corpsman prepare to bandage a patient during a simulated casualty exercise during combat lifesaver training at Crow Valley, Philippines, May 8, 2014, during Balikatan 2014. The training was designed for non-medical personnel and developed the skills necessary to administer first aid in a field environment. Balikatan is an annual training exercise that strengthens the interoperability between the armed forces of the Philippines and U.S. military in their commitment to regional security and stability, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. (Photo by Spc. Matthew Sissel)


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CROW VALLEY, Philippines -- bPhilippine and U.S. Marines exchanged combat medical techniques during a bilateral exchange of best practices May 8, 2014, for Balikatan 2014.

The Marines from both nations taught each other how to manage bleeding, splint broken limbs, apply occlusive dressings, administer IVs and triage patients in their own ways during the all-day event.

Philippine Marine Master Sgt. Jesus D. De Guia, a corpsman with 7th Marine Brigade, said the bilateral training benefited both nations.

“It's a sharing of ideas. We are able to help each other in terms of knowledge. We learn from them and they learn from us,” De Guia said. “It's a great opportunity for the guys to be training side-by-side with the U.S. Marine Corps.”

U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Jerween R. Viola, who is assigned to 3rd Medical Battalion, said Filipinos, like De Guia, taught him to be a better medic.

“I learned a lot from them, especially adapting and overcoming,” Viola said. “They taught me how to use things we don't have in our bags: bamboo sticks, plywood, cardboard boxes ... plentiful resources.”

Viola said cardboard boxes can be used for splinting material, and bamboo sticks can be used to make an improvised litter.

“Training with the Filipino Marines is very fulfilling,” he said.

Balikatan is an annual training exercise that strengthens the interoperability between the armed forces of the Philippines and U.S. military in their commitment to regional security and stability, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.
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